How much do you know about your cholesterol?

Not all cholesterols are bad. The low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) does harm to the blood vessels, while high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) benefits the blood vessels by removing excessive cholesterol in the artery and thus prevents stroke or heart attack. Both of the following conditions will increase the risks of stroke, heart disease as well as peripheral vascular disease: Excessive high level of LDL-C may accumulate redundant cholesterol in the artery, or extremely low HDL-C fails to effectively eliminate blood cholesterol. For most of the people with diabetes, the application of blood lipid lower agent (Statin) is sufficient to control the LDL-C level. Therefore, the American Diabetes Association recommends that all people with diabetes and aged over 40 years (regardless the existence of cardiovascular risks) shall receive Statin treatment.
According to the American Diabetes Association, the ideal blood lipid levels for people with diabetes are as follows:
Blood lipids Ideal level
Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) <100mg/dL, Normal
<70mg/dL, with cardiovascular disease
High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) ♀>50mg/dL
♂>40mg/dL
Reminder: People with diabetes must adhere to the blood lipid lowering agents prescribed by the physician. For any adverse side-effects caused by the medication, please contact your medical care team first. Do not self-discontinue medication.
Diabetes care:How much do you know about your cholesterol?

Reference: 1.American Diabetes Association;2.Diabetes Forecast January / February 2018

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